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WHAT IT WAS LIKE RESPONDING TO AL-QAEDA’S BOMBING OF THE US EMBASSY IN KENYA

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In August 1996, Usama Bin Laden issued a fatwa against Americans, declaring holy war against the United States and its interests. The fatwa reads, in part:

“The people of Islam awakened and realised that they are the main target for the aggression of the Zionist-Crusaders alliance. All false claims and propaganda about ‘Human Rights’ were hammered down and exposed by the massacres that took place against the Muslims in every part of the world.”

Two years later on Aug. 7, 1998, bombs exploded almost simultaneously at U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The death toll came in at a staggering 224 people, with more than 5,000 wounded. Twelve of the fallen were U.S. citizens. Bin Laden and his soon-to-be infamous Al-Qaeda terror organization were responsible.

FORMER FBI AGENT ANALYZES LAS VEGAS SHOOTER

As the law enforcement investigation continues, we too continue to investigate just who Stephen Paddock was and how he carried out his devastating attack.  Contact 13 dug into Paddock's past and the planning that may have involved another Las Vegas music festival. We got a tip early Tuesday morning that's now been reported by multiple national news outlets.

Stephen Paddock reportedly rented a high rise unit at The Ogden overlooking the Life is Beautiful music festival one week before his deadly shooting rampage.  Would it have been a dry run?  A scouting mission?  Or a planned attack not carried out?

HOW CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS CAN THWART RADICALIZATION IN PRISONS

Radical extremists aren’t just being groomed from the depths of the internet, they are being actively recruited, pumped with radical ideology and sent back into communities, all under the nose of law enforcement. “The prison system is absolutely an incubator for radicalization,” said Brig Barker.

When Barker started his 21-year FBI career as an agent in 1995, his first collateral assignment was as a correctional intelligence liaison, essentially interviewing inmates who were radicalized. “This was my first glimpse into that world,” he said. In 2015, towards the end of his FBI career, he volunteered once again to be part of the BOP/FBI’s Correctional Intelligence Initiative (CII) assessing radicalization in prisons.

PADDOCK POSSIBLY PSYCHOTIC BUT NOT 'PSYCHOPATH', EXPERTS SAY

Exasperated by reporters asking if he knew why Stephen Paddock went on his horrific shooting spree, Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo seemed to grit his teeth this week before spitting out his response: “I can’t get into the mind of a psychopath.” In the absence of any answers about what led Paddock, 64, to became a stone cold killer, even “just the facts” lawmen like Lombardo are filling in the blanks with supposition.

UNLV psychology Professor Stephen Benning says it’s human nature to want an explanation for such a heinous an incomprehensible crime, but he’s fairly certain the sheriff missed the mark. “Psychopath has become a shorthand term for a sadistic, extraordinarily violent individual,” said Benning, who has researched psychopaths for years.

EXCLUSIVE: YEARS AFTER JOLTING SNOWDEN LEAKS, NSA BATTLES TO REGAIN EDGE

Several years after contractor Edward Snowden abruptly left the U.S. in 2013 with a trove of highly classified secrets, the National Security Agency and its counterparts in the U.S. intelligence community continue to struggle under the crushing impact of his actions.

“It should be pretty obvious to everyone that what Snowden did was a jolt to our system. Not only did he endanger what we’ve spent years developing, but he endangered the lives of the people we try to protect,” NSA Deputy Director George C. Barnes told WTOP in an exclusive interview.

Although Snowden revealed specific sources and methods, which may now be obsolete, the principal damage is that he provided global insight into the NSA’s thought process, Barnes said. More egregiously, Barnes added, Snowden made the agency’s secrets the stuff of dangerous global gossip.

10 WAYS POLICE CAN IDENTIFY RADICAL EXTREMISM

Police officers around the country understand they are an important element in the fight against terrorism. But what does that entail? How can an officer identify potential terrorist activity? What should officers look for as signs a person may have been radicalized?

[Related: Training Police in Counterintelligence to Combat Domestic Terrorism]

During the 2nd annual Gulf Coast INLETS seminar in April in New Orleans, Brig Barker, who spent 20 years as a counterterrorism agent with the FBI and is considered an expert on the Jihadist mindset, gave a presentation called Homegrown Violent Extremists: Counterterrorism Strategies for Law Enforcement.

During this session, he discussed some of the signs of radicalization that officers should look for during their normal duties. For example, officers need to be on the lookout for books and magazines that promote the ideology of terrorist leaders and Jihadist scholars. “If you see certain propaganda during a traffic stop, you need to recognize it and be able to evaluate it,” said Barker.

FORMER FBI AGENTS ON PIPE BOMBS: DON'T RULE OUT 'FALSE FLAG' OR NONPOLITICAL MOTIVE

Former FBI agents have warned against jumping to conclusions about why mail bombs were sent to President Trump's political enemies.

While speculation about the reason the packages were mailed this week runs from an effort to murder the addressees to a "false flag" campaign to damage Republicans ahead of the midterm election, experienced investigators say it is is difficult to deduce much about the bombmaker or his or her motive based on available public details.

Often, they caution, motives are not what they at first appear.

“I wouldn't eliminate Republican leanings or Democratic leanings. The bottom line is, it is a political message that someone is sending out,” said 35-year FBI veteran James Wedick. "You have to ask, 'What message was being sent?'”

Brig Barker, who worked 21 years as an FBI agent, said in his career, suspects often had different motives than investigators first assumed. "Politically, it could be a Republican, it could be a Democrat, it could be an independent, it could be someone totally apolitical,” Barker said.

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